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Join the Flock

  • Keep it Kind

At Penny’s Pigeon Aid, kindness is at the heart of all that we do. It is why we believe so fervently that all living things should be treated with kindness, including the largely mistreated pigeon.

The biggest way that we can ignite social change is by creating a like-minded following. We need people that display the characteristics of our organisation in their everyday lives. Thankfully, there’s already plenty of people out there who are passionate about pigeons, we’re just here to connect them.

  • Keep it Informed

We are passionate about remaining educated and educating our followers on good pigeon welfare, to help them help the birds. There is nothing worse than misinformed good will, and so we’re trying our best to ensure that everyone understands how best they can help.

  • Keep it Up

A hugely important aspect of our movement is spreading the word, and building a community of passionate pigeon people who will consistently push better pigeon propaganda.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

With 18 million pigeons residing in the UK alone, and many more in almost every country in the world, pigeons are here to stay. At Penny's Pigeon Aid, we want people to get to know their feathered neighbours and understand the value that they can bring. By promoting kindness and education, we can create a society where we co-exist peacefully with all living creatures. After all, pigeons were once the number one companion of human kind, and now they deserve human kindness. 

STOPPING ABUSE

If you witness a pigeon being abused then please report this immediately by either contacting:

  • The Police on 101

  • RSPB Wildlife Enquiries on 01767 693690 (or email: wildlife@rspb.org.uk)

  • Report it to your local RSPCA: Report Cruelty | RSPCA 

  • If you have tried the above but still feel a bit stuck then contact PETA on: 757-622-7382

  • Pick up the bird carefully with both hands over each wing, or by using a jacket/shirt/cloth/tea towel draped over it.

  • Place the bird into a dark and warm box/container, anything that would comfortably fit a guinea pig or hedgehog would work well. 

  • Offer the bird some water, as dehydration is a risk if the bird has been distressed for a long time. You can also add a pinch of sugar and salt to boost the bird’s electrolytes. 

  • Then offer the bird some food, like seeds and grains.​

HOW TO HELP A PIGEON IN NEED

Feeding Squabs
  • If you feel that the pigeon needs expert attention, then try and contact your local wildlife rehabilitator or wildlife bird rescue centre, sadly vets are not obliged to take in wildlife for free, and typically aren't trained in the care of wildlife, so it is always best to contact a specialist organisation.

  • Things like a broken wing, excessive bleeding, refusing to eat, and respiratory distress will require the attention of an expert.​

OUR STANCE ON FEEDING PIGEONS

It may sound shocking, but Penny’s Pigeon Aid does not encourage the feeding of feral pigeons in towns or public spaces. Studies have shown that although supplementary feeding may appear to be helpful to the birds, it can actually be detrimental to their health and wellbeing.

PROBLEMS WITH FEEDING PIGEONS

  • It can cause too many pigeons to gather in one area, causing starvation as the food and resources do not consistently match the amount of birds.

  • It can cause malnutrition and digestive issues if pigeons are fed the wrong type of food, such as bread.

  • It will diminish the pigeon’s ability to find food for itself.

  • A large amount of pigeons could deface buildings and pavements from droppings.

  • Pigeons may begin nesting in the area which could lead to people calling pest control.

  • It may encourage other urban wildlife, such as rats, to gather within the same area.

ALTERNATIVE WAYS TO HELP PIGEONS

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  • Leave out fresh water for pigeons to drink and bathe in.

  • Provide nest boxes, pigeons love flat surfaces to nest on.

  • Ensure that your pigeon safe spaces are out of reach of local cats!

  • Plant some pigeon-friendly plants, some examples are:

 

Berries: ivy, buckthorn, blackberry, Hawthorn, rose hip, dogwood, spindle-tree, elderberry.

Tree flowers & leaf buds: ash, beech, elm, hawthorn, hazel, willow, oak, elderberry.

Leaves: Various clovers, charlock, cultivated mustard, poppy, knotgrass, scarlet pimpernel, sheep’s sorrel, dandelion, speedwell, grass, sugar beet, buttercup

Seeds & nuts: wild oat, wild pansy, chickweeds, common vetch, knotgrass, beech nuts, hazel nuts, acorns.

CLEANING OUR STREETS

Pigeons have an amazing ability to self-manage their population based on the food and resources available, therefore the more that food is accessible, the more pigeons will appear. That’s why it is important to keep our outside spaces clean and free from litter or waste, both at home and in our businesses. Human waste is bad for a pigeon’s diet, making their droppings more difficult to clean and making them sick, try and keep everything in an outside bin with the lid down.

​PAINTING PIGEONS IN A BETTER LIGHT

Our best weapon to alter people’s perception of pigeons is to use our voice. So spread the word! Take photographs of your feathered friends, share heart-warming stories, educate people on amazing pigeon facts, and learn more about their history. You can even post your photographs on our Facebook Page: Penny’s Pigeon Aid or on our websites Groups Page, where we have built a community that celebrates all things pigeon!

Lovely pigeon, by a follower

If you spot a pigeon in need

Think carefully before you intervene, does the bird need your assistance urgently? ​

If it appears injured or distressed, then watch it closely to see how hurt it is.​

If you decide to intervene, then it’s important to wear gloves or to use an item of clothing like a jacket or shirt, this may help you handle the pigeon easier and cause it less stress.​

Follow the instructions highlighted above.

If you spot a baby pigeon in need

Sometimes, a baby/ very young pigeon does not require intervention, as the parents may be nearby.​

Baby pigeons leave their nests just before they can fly, and spend some time on the ground being fed by their parents before they fend for themselves. However, if there are humans nearby then the parents may not return until the coast is clear. ​

Again, watch closely to assess the situation. If the fledgling is in imminent danger then move it to a safe place a short distance away. Return an hour later to see if the bird is still there. ​

A fully feathered young bird (fledgling) should be left alone where possible unless injured or sick, and if the bird is not fully feathered (a baby that should be in the nest) then try putting it back in the nest first, if you can locate it. 

If you spot a racing pigeon

Racing pigeons travel extremely long distances and will stop for a break along the way if they are tired. If you spot one, place some seed/ corn/ uncooked rice/ lentils and water in an accessible place and ensure that the bird is safe from predators. Food, water, and rest will usually help them recover enough to continue their journey home. If the pigeon hasn’t flown off and isn’t injured, report it to the Royal Pigeon Racing Association (RPRA). Their dedicated team helps reunite lost racing pigeons with their owners.​

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KEEP IT HUMANE

Pigeons have learnt to inhabit urban spaces, enjoying flat services to nest on, like buildings or ledges. We understand that this can pose a difficulty, but there are humane ways of dealing with the pigeon population. Just remember, pigeon droppings have not been shown to present a health risk to humans, and this is therefore not a reason to kill them. Plus, killing pigeons will not solve the issue of their presence.

REMEMBER: KILLING PIGEONS DOES NOT REDUCE THEIR NUMBERS, BUT IT WILL CAUSE UNNECESSARY SUFFERING. STAY EDUCATED AND STAY KIND.

1. REMOVE FOOD SOURCES 

This includes your rubbish. Any accessible food source will attract urban wildlife (rats, foxes, crows etc) remove the food source and this will help manage the issue.

2. BE CAUTIOUS IF FEEDING PIGEONS IN YOUR GARDEN

This one may seem surprising, but as pigeons are intelligent and recognize faces and places, they will return to your garden with their flock if you feed them. This puts them at risk of pest control if a neighbor reports them. As soon as the food source is removed the flock will eventually disperse to a number that the area can naturally accommodate.

3. BLOCK ROOSTING AND NESTING HUMANELY 

Using metal/ wood sheathing or 'bird wires' will remove the options for pigeons to nest, do not use any kind of gels and be careful with netting, although effective for large areas, it can cause pigeons to become trapped. 

HELPFUL RESOURCES

Found an injured pigeon: The RSPCA

If you find an injured bird: the RSPB

Frequently asked questions about sick and injured birds: RSPB

What to do when you find a sick/injured pigeon: London Wildlife Protection

Squabs

How To Help An Injured Pigeon: Garden Bird

When to help baby feral pigeons: Help Wildlife

Penny's Story

Meet the Team

About Us

Pigeon History

Pigeon Drawing, by Daisy

Meet the people passionate about pigeons and the driving force behind Penny's Pigeon Aid.

Learn more about Penny's Pigeon Aid and our overall mission, as well as what we hope to achieve in the future.

Find out how Penny's Pigeon Aid is igniting social change, and altering the way that pigeons are viewed, forever.

Discover the amazing and tragic history of pigeons, their integral role in society for thousands of years, and their eventual downfall.

Pigeon Drawing, by Daisy
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‘It is an extraordinary thing that a large proportion of citizens never see a wild creature from dawn 'til dusk, unless it's a pigeon, which isn't really wild.’

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